Can you fix concrete posts?

Damaged concrete poles can cause serious structural problems that cost hundreds of dollars to repair. The most common examples of damage to concrete posts are holes, cracks, and damaged corners if the post has a square base.

Can you fix concrete posts?

Damaged concrete poles can cause serious structural problems that cost hundreds of dollars to repair. The most common examples of damage to concrete posts are holes, cracks, and damaged corners if the post has a square base. Repairing a concrete pole is inexpensive and easy to perform with just a few supplies. Depending on the severity of the damage, a fence patch kit may be the best option.

These kits are impact and UV resistant, helping to repair holes, small cracks and minor damage. For more serious issues, consider fence post supports and ground spikes that can be driven through the concrete base and attached to the post to create a secure base for the fence post. Then, dig a hole around at least 1 side of the pole, exposing the concrete and giving it a little room to move. Concreting fence posts can seem like a pretty daunting task if you've never done it before, but as long as you work systematically and take your time, there's no reason you shouldn't end up with professional-looking work.

Another question we get is whether or not fence post spikes will work if your post wasn't originally placed in concrete. Common factors that can contribute to ongoing damage include highly acidic concrete footings, moisture traps that collect rainwater at the base of the fence post, and insect infestations, such as carpenter ants, termites, and powder post beetles. Learn everything about placing concrete on fence posts, including the size of post you should use, the depth of the hole for the post you are using, the correct proportion of concrete mix you should use, and how to position the fence posts so they don't rot and how to keep them straight and level. For a stronger solution, pour a quick-setting concrete bag directly into the new hole and around the base of the post.

A final point to note is that, over time, the posts may shrink a little, which causes small gaps around them and the concrete. Consider using a mallet or jackhammer to break concrete into smaller pieces to make the job easier. Assuming your post was positioned correctly at first, there is likely a large chunk of concrete around the base of the post. DIYers will need to dig up to the concrete base, discovering it enough that the block can be dragged up and out of the ground.

Replacing a fence post can seem like a daunting task, especially if the concrete holds the original post in place. When the concrete is well mixed, start shoveling it into the hole, surrounding the pole with concrete. This will keep the post square and level in the hole as you fill it with concrete and until it settles. Wait about three days for the concrete to cure, then reattach the fence parts to the fence post with new brackets and screws.

Riley Ryan
Riley Ryan

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