Bonding Concrete to Concrete: A Step-by-Step Guide

Learn how to bond concrete to concrete with this step-by-step guide. We'll cover everything from preparing the surface to selecting the right cement mix.

Bonding Concrete to Concrete: A Step-by-Step Guide

If you're looking for a reliable way to bond concrete to concrete, you've come to the right place. In this article, we'll provide a step-by-step guide on how to achieve a strong and durable bond between new and old concrete. First, you'll need to prepare the surface by sweeping away all loose stones and dirt and rinsing the concrete. Then, you'll need to apply an adhesive bonding agent such as SikaLaTex Concrete Bond Adhesive.

This product eliminates the need to roughen the surface prior to application and exceeds performance requirements of ASTM C 1059 Type I and II. You can brush it, spray it, or spray it onto the existing concrete surface, or use it as a substitute for water in a concrete slurry or mortar. Alternatively, you can use it in a grout mix, which is particularly attractive for tile floors in unheated mud. Once the adhesive has become tacky, apply a scrape coat and then apply the repair material.

When patching existing concrete, you should use products such as Sakrete Sand Mix and Sakrete Fast Set Cement Patcher with a liquid chemical binding agent such as Sakrete Bonder & Fortifier. This will help ensure that the fresh concrete adheres properly. If it's a deck or slab repair, mixing concrete with a bonding agent allows you to work quickly and form the repair on the platform. The thinnest layer of new concrete you should apply to old concrete is about 2 to 2 ½ inches.

You must wait for the right weather conditions, select the right cement mix, use the proper proportion and work quickly enough that the concrete does not begin to set before it is ready. To avoid completing the same project twice, be sure to follow the instructions on the concrete agent packaging.Finally, if there are unresolved problems with old concrete, including frost and cracks, they can be moved to new concrete. In this case, you must remove the old concrete and resolve the underlying problem before continuing to lay new concrete.

Riley Ryan
Riley Ryan

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