Is 2 feet deep enough for fence posts?

Digging the holes between one-third and one-half the height above the ground of the pole is a general formula. The deeper you dig the holes, the more stability your fence has.

Is 2 feet deep enough for fence posts?

Digging the holes between one-third and one-half the height above the ground of the pole is a general formula. The deeper you dig the holes, the more stability your fence has. You can install fence posts with 2-foot deep holes, and that is the minimum depth. However, you should dig deeper holes if the fence post is 7 feet or longer.

Dig holes with a depth that is at least half the size of the fence post. Panel Post DepthThe minimum depth you need to dig fence post holes for panel sections is 2 feet. A general formula is to dig the holes between one-third and one-half the height above the ground of the pole. The deeper you dig the holes, the more stability your fence has, but you should also buy longer posts.

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Did you know that we have our own transport fleet and handle all our deliveries from our headquarters in Kent? Jackson Fencing has three fencing centers located in the southeast, southwest and northwest of the country. We don't believe in high-pressure sales tactics, so feel free to call us, send us an inquiry or use our live chat. The best way to ensure that your poles stay sturdy and true for years is to install them at the correct depth and use a high-quality concrete mix. Check out our recommendation to find out what depths we recommend digging for a fence post.

Digging post holes are a necessary element of any fence installation. Below we explain the simplest and most accurate way to dig holes for suitable posts, as well as the depth and recommended tools. One of the most common questions we are asked is “how deep should I install a fence pole in the ground?”. Unfortunately, there is no fence post depth calculator because the depth of the pit depends on several factors, including the height and type of fence, as well as the width of the fence post.

We strongly recommend that, before you start digging the hole in the fence post, you check for electricity from the mains or that you contact your utility company to mark any underground cables or hazards. Doing this also allows you to re-evaluate the fence line, layout, and any positioning issues to make sure everything is exactly where you need it. For additional advice on the positives and negatives of concrete and wood fence posts, which gives you a fair assessment of each type, check out our blog covering the topic. If you are planning to DIY, we strongly recommend a post digger or rabbit hole digger, which is essentially a unique shovel that has been designed to dig circular holes.

The unique design allows the user to dig directly to the ideal depth and keep the hole relatively narrow in diameter compared to a conventional shovel. For any type of fence, the depth of the hole you need to dig depends on the height of the pole above the ground. You should always bury a third of the fence post underground. For a 6-foot fence, for example, you need a 9-foot pole, so that 3 feet can be underground.

This means that unless you're building a 2-foot fence, which is unlikely in any garden, a 1-foot hole won't be deep enough to hold your pole. For the main and front door posts, you need to dig the holes an additional 6 inches deep. If you are going to place wooden or concrete poles on concrete, you will need 8-foot (2.4 m) posts for a 6-foot (1,828 m) fence, i.e. Its posts are 2 feet (0.6 m) longer than the height of the fence.

Use 4-inch x 4-inch posts for fences 5 feet and above and 3-inch x 3-inch posts for anything less than 5 feet. When it comes to building a fence, the depth of the post will depend on the size of the fence you are building. You can use concrete, if you want, but moisture in concrete can sometimes cause wooden posts to rot faster, while gravel allows water to drain quickly away from the fence post and into the ground. If I had a dollar for the number of times we've seen fences that aren't level, one post out of place, one hole deeper than another, and several other setbacks.

If you place a pole in soft ground or in an area that receives strong winds, it's always a good idea to bury the poles a little deeper and add more concrete. As mentioned earlier, the depth you need to dig for the fence post should always depend on the size of the fence you are building. If you are going to put wooden or concrete poles on concrete, you will need 8-foot (2.4 m) posts for a 6-foot (1,828 m) fence — i. If you need to dig a large number of holes to install the fence posts, a post auger is a rental tool worthy of consideration.

This will ensure that you have taken into account the frost line and provide a solid foundation for the safety of the fence. In many areas, digging a meter into the ground is not an easy task for a hole, so an auger can save a huge amount of work. The depth of the post holes (and how well the posts are anchored) are the most important factors in the stability of your fence. .

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Riley Ryan
Riley Ryan

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